iPads Calm Surgery-Bound Kids as Well as Sedatives

Title: iPads Calm Surgery-Bound Kids as Well as SedativesCategory: Health NewsCreated: 8/30/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/30/2016 12:00:00 AM

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iPads Calm Surgery-Bound Kids as Well as Sedatives

Selena Gomez taking time off for health reasons

(CNN)Selena Gomez is taking time off to deal with issues stemming from her Lupus. “I’ve discovered that anxiety, panic attacks and depression can be side effects of Lupus, which can present their own challenges,” Gomez said in a statement to CNN. “I want to be proactive and focus on maintaining

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Selena Gomez taking time off for health reasons

Selena Gomez taking time off for health reasons

(CNN)Selena Gomez is taking time off to deal with issues stemming from her Lupus.

“I’ve discovered that anxiety, panic attacks and depression can be side effects of Lupus, which can present their own challenges,” Gomez said in a statement to CNN. “I want to be proactive and focus on maintaining my health and happiness and have decided that the best way forward is to take some time off.”

    Gomez had been scheduled to perform for two dates in Canada at the beginning of September and tour in Europe and South America through the end of the year. Her representatives have not said whether she plans to cancel or reschedule the dates.
    The singer revealed her battle with Lupus last year.
    “Thank you to all my fans for your support,” Gomez added. “You know how special you are to me, but I need to face this head on to ensure I am doing everything possible to be my best. I know I am not alone and by sharing this, I hope others will be encouraged to address their own issues.”

    Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects an estimated 1.5 million Americans, according to the Lupus Foundation of America.
    Gomez kicked off her Revival Tour back in May and toured throughout the summer.
    In June, Gomez lost her close friend Christina Grimmie, who was shot by an obsessed fan at a meet-and-greet.
    Back in 2013, Gomez canceled tour dates to privately deal with her disease.

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2016/08/30/entertainment/selena-gomez-break/index.html

    The post Selena Gomez taking time off for health reasons appeared first on Current Health Events.

    Selena Gomez taking time off for health reasons

    You Asked: Why Can’t I Remember Things?

    You spaced on that lunch meeting you said you’d attend, or you forgot a promise you’d made to a friend. Minor memory lapses strike us all from time to time. But if your brain seems increasingly unable to hold onto new information, stress may be to blame.

    “There’s a lot of evidence to suggest chronic stress can lead to memory impairments,” says Jason Radley, an assistant professor of brain sciences at the University of Iowa. Radley’s research has shown high or prolonged spikes in the stress hormone cortisol may “prune” the synapses in your brain’s prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, which are essential for certain brain functions, including memory.

    “Stress levels naturally elevate through the process of aging,” Radley says. “And for those who suffer from chronic stress, it seems the cumulative exposure to cortisol over a person’s lifespan may produce a weathering of the brain and an erosion of cognitive functioning.”

    It’s less clear if a super-stressful week or month could make a young person more forgetful, Radley says. Instead, your stress may be messing with your sleep.

    “Sleep loss can disrupt the process of memory consolidation,” or sorting and storage, says Christoph Nissen, a professor of sleep medicine at the University of Freiburg in Germany. His research suggests sleep provides your brain the opportunity to both replay and strengthen new memories while also discarding the frivolous stuff you don’t need to remember.

    Sleep loss can also hurt your brain’s ability to encode new memories, Nissen says. So in more ways than one, a poor night’s sleep can hamper your memory. Your goal should be eight hours every night, though an occasional night of just six hours of sleep won’t do much damage to your memories, Nissen says.

    Stress and sleep aside, multitasking behaviors can also disrupt your brain’s ability to store new memories, says David Meyer, a professor of psychology and cognition at the University of Michigan who has studied the impacts of multitasking on memory. “When you’re multitasking, that’s interfering with processes that normally would be devoted 100% to doing the mental work that moves info from short term memory into long term memory,” he explains.

    He mentions a well-known experiment during which researchers observed the brain activity of people who were trying to learn new information while multitasking. Compared to a group that was focused solely on learning the new info, the multitaskers had disruptions in the parts of their brain used for learning and memory consolidation. On a follow-up test, the multitaskers had higher error rates than their single-focus counterparts, Meyer says.

    Your brain needs small breaks after a task in order to lock away new memories. If you’re replying to emails while participating in a conference call or chatting with a colleague, Meyer says, your over-tasked mind just won’t have the chance to store the new information it’s collecting.

    The post You Asked: Why Can’t I Remember Things? appeared first on Current Health Events.

    You Asked: Why Can’t I Remember Things?

    Selena Gomez Just Revealed She’s Taking A Break To Focus On Her Health

    Listen, people, Selena Gomez is only human!

    The 24-year-old singer seems to be overwhelmed due to a hectic year.

    Not only has she been on tour for the last four months, but shes also been knee-deep in endless Justin Bieber-related drama.

    It looks like things might be catching up to Selena, according to her most recent interview.

    The pop star spoke to People, stating,

    As many of you know, around a year ago I revealed that I have lupus. Ive discovered that anxiety, panic attacks and depression can be side effects of lupus, which can present their own challenges.

    They certainly can. After all, regardless of the money and the fame, these celebrities are just like us.

    When your health comes knocking at the door, its only right that you answer it.

    Sure, this might be upsetting news to her loyal fans, but Selenas got the right idea.

    She continued,

    I want to be proactive and focus on maintaining my health and happiness and have decided that the best way forward is to take some time off.

    Co-CEO and co-president of the Lupus Research Alliance,Kenneth M. Farber, also spoke to the magazine. He said,

    It is not commonly known that depression, anxiety and panic attacks can be side effects of lupus. We are so proud of Selena for taking care of herself and bringing awareness to this sometimes very misunderstood illness.

    Despite announcing that shell be taking some time to tend to herself, Selena Gomez hasnt announced whether or not her upcoming Revival World Tour dates will be rescheduled.

    Hey, Selena, youre doing the right thing, and youre setting a GREAT exampleofthe importance oftaking care of yourself for your fans.

    Depression and anxiety are no joke!

    Subscribe to Elite Dailys official newsletter,The Edge, for more stories you dont want to miss.


    Read more: http://elitedaily.com/entertainment/celebrity/selena-gomez-taking-break-focus-on-health/1596711/

    The post Selena Gomez Just Revealed She’s Taking A Break To Focus On Her Health appeared first on Current Health Events.

    Selena Gomez Just Revealed She’s Taking A Break To Focus On Her Health

    Zika Can Also Cause Hearing Loss: Study

    The health problems associated with the Zika virus continue to pile up, and a new report from researchers in Brazil reveals that the virus can also cause hearing loss in babies born to a mother who was infected.

    Scientists are still in the early stages of understanding the full breadth of the health problems that are caused by Zika. The virus is proven to cause the birth defect microcephaly, and other recent studies have shown the virus is also responsible for vision problems and other serious brain damage.

    In the new study, published Tuesday in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, scientists report that out of 70 kids with Zika-related microcephaly, four had hearing loss that was caused by damage to the inner ear or damage to the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The hearing loss couldn’t be attributed to any other cause. Based on this, the researchers say hearing loss should be considered another risk factor for Zika.

    Other congenital infections are known to cause hearing problems, but this is one of the first times its been documented among children with Zika-related microcephaly. The researchers add that it’s possible some children born with Zika infections but without microcephaly could also be at risk for hearing problems, though this has not yet been determined.

    The post Zika Can Also Cause Hearing Loss: Study appeared first on Current Health Events.

    Zika Can Also Cause Hearing Loss: Study

    Abortion Restrictions in Ohio Hurt Women’s Health, Study Finds

    Abortion restrictions implemented in Ohio in 2011 under the guise of protecting women’s health led to more side-effects and follow-up visits for patients, according to a new study out of the University of California, San Francisco.

    The 2011 Ohio law makes sense on paper: it requires abortion providers to prescribe the abortion medication mifepristone (also known as RU-486) in compliance with federally approved guidelines. But those FDA guidelines had been last updated in 2000, which meant that providers were legally required to prescribe abortion medication according to protocols that were more than a decade old, even though evidence-based medical consensus suggested that a slightly different regimen might be safer, easier and more effective.

    The Ohio law required doctors to adhere to recommendations present on the original drug label-the dose of the drug was considerably higher when the pill was first introduced, and the period of time for which is it thought to be safe to take has grown since the late 1990s-even though that guidance was based on outdated medical research.

    In March of 2016 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) updated its guidelines to bring its mifepristone recommendations in line with current evidence. But between 2011 and 2016, Ohio abortion providers were legally required to prescribe the abortion medication in a regimen that was out-of-step with the latest science.

    “On the face of it, it sounds reasonable to require providers to use FDA protocol,” says Dr. Ushma Upadhyay, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UCSF and lead author of the study. “But it’s an inferior protocol.”

    That led to worse outcomes for the patients. The UCSF study of more than 2,700 Ohio patients, published Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine, found that between 2011 and 2016, Ohio women who had medical abortions were almost three times more likely to require additional medical treatment than they had been before the law was passed (before the law was passed, only 5% of medical abortions required additional treatment, but after the 2011 law more than 14% of medical abortions resulted in a follow-up visit). Patients also reported higher logistical burdens (the law required patients to make four visits instead of two) and increased rates of side effects like nausea and vomiting, likely due to the higher dose of the drug.

    The law also seems to have correlated to an 80% decline in medical abortions, which is troubling because medical abortions (which are done with medication in the early stages of a pregnancy) are widely considered to be cheaper and less invasive than surgical abortions. Before the 2011 law, 22% of Ohio abortions were medical abortions, but by 2014 only 5% of all Ohio abortions were medical abortions.

    The study comes just two months after the Supreme Court struck down a Texas abortion law that would have closed more than half the state’s abortion clinics, ruling that the restrictions-which were presented as regulations to protect women’s health-constituted an “undue burden” on the constitutional right to an abortion. In his majority opinion, Justice Stephen Breyer wrote that there was not enough “medical benefit” to justify the restrictions.

    Dr. Upadhyay says she knows of no other state law that outlaws or requires providers to use a specific federal regimen. Usually doctors are free to prescribe treatment according to the latest clinical research and evolving best practices, not slow-moving federal guidelines. “This medication was singled out,” she says.

    Similar laws regulating the use of abortion medication are on the books in North Dakota and Texas.

    The FDA updated its guidelines for mifepristone usage in early 2016, bringing them in line with current medical practice-that meant reducing the dosage, decreasing the number of required follow-up visits, and extending the period of time during which it can be used-but the restrictive laws still require doctors to follow the FDA guidelines, not the latest science. And if research outstrips the FDA guidelines again, doctors will have their hands tied.

    “There’s no way a federal agency could dictate how a specific medication regimen should go for all patients,” says Dr. Upadhyay. “When a law doesn’t follow the evidence, and doesn’t respect the doctor-patient relationship, I think it causes problems.”

    The post Abortion Restrictions in Ohio Hurt Women’s Health, Study Finds appeared first on Current Health Events.

    Abortion Restrictions in Ohio Hurt Women’s Health, Study Finds